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Entries in high school (3)

Wednesday
Aug162017

Fall senior photo deadlines are sooner than you think (Clackamas senior photographer)

I’m definitely a summer person. I love being outside, going for evening walks and swimming any chance I can get. So I hate to think about back-to-school just as much as the next person. But alas, the time has come for Clackamas area high school seniors and their parents to start thinking about one right of passage: it’s time to book senior portraits.

Many high schools’ yearbook due dates are in fall, and there are many steps you’ll need to take: schedule an photo session, prepare for said photo session by planning outfits/haircuts, etc., choose a non-rainy day, have a great experience during the photo session, wait while your photographer edits your photos, choose one for the yearbook, and then provide it to the school staff in whatever format they need it.

This all takes time, and rushing the process isn’t in your best interest. I recommend booking a photo session soon.

Here are some of local, North Clackamas and Clackamas County due dates for your reference. However, please refer to official information from your school and please read all specifications carefully. Please note that senior ads, quotes and all other senior year/yearbook needs are handled completely separately. It is your responsibility to make sure your photos is submitted before the deadline.

Whoa, I'm not usually all business like this. If you have any questions about how to make the process as painless as possible, feel free to email or comment below. 

Class of 2018 senior photo deadlines:

Here’s a short video of some recent senior photo sessions. I had a blast with each student! If you’d like to schedule a photo session with me, please email jessiekirkphotography@gmail.com 

 

Sunday
Mar242013

Shelby is my homegirl/Centennial High School, class of 2013 (Portland, Oregon senior photographer)

The eldest daughter of a wonderful family, Shelby is kind, thoughtful and so sweet to her siblings. She’s also a great athlete, super hardworking and fun to be around. By the time we shot her senior photos, she’d already been in front of my lens for some family photos and as a bridesmaid for her mom and dad’s wedding. She was a pro.

We met at Laurelhurst Park, an expansive and diverse park for photographs or for hanging out in Southeast Portland. Shelby brought her best friend along to make the day even more fun and to help keep her energy up on a cold, winter morning. (Thanks for holding my sorry-looking reflector Jessica!) After an outfit change, Shelby’s amazing mom went and got us all hot chocolate to keep us warm between shots. (Love ya Tiffany!)

Shelby helped me realize that senior photography is one of my absolute favorite things to do. High schoolers are fun to be around and always make me laugh. It doesn’t hurt that I’m a bit of a teenager at heart myself; someday I’ll be too old to talk about boys, laugh at fake moustaches and dance like crazy to Usher, but today is not that day!

Monday
Feb182013

Everything I need to know about photography I learned by writing the news

Welcome amigos.

I’m Jessie Kirk and I’m a Portland-area wedding and portrait photographer. I’m overwhelmed with inspiration, I chase natural light and I get to work with amazing, funny, beautiful people. 

So how did I get here? Well it all started with a murder trial.

Just follow me here.

At my high school everyone had to go on a job shadow to learn about career possibilities. I wasn’t sure what I wanted to do, so I joined a group shadow with a lawyer. The day came and our group of a dozen or so students sat in on a real murder trial at the Oregon City Courthouse. As we sat listening to a witness regale us with a terrible story of a bar fight gone wrong, I took frantic notes. I didn’t know why I was doing it, but I felt compelled to write the story down so I wouldn’t forget it. When I looked around, my classmates were talking to each other or looking bored. No one else even had a piece of paper out.

It took me a little while to realize it, but I was a journalist. I wanted to capture every moment and tell everyone’s story.   

I went to journalism school and took on an internship as a reporter for a small-town weekly newspaper. My first editor sent me out to cover things like city council meetings, school plays and a beauty pageant for high school boys. Each time he asked me to take a camera and he praised me for the images I brought back. He’s the first one who told me I had “the eye” and I was thrilled. One day he asked me if I would be willing to photograph another reporter’s assignment. It turned out to be a burn-to-learn, where firefighters set fire to an abandoned structure to practice putting out the flames. The reporter and I crouched in the creaky, doomed house as fire lapped up around us and it got hotter and hotter.  I snapped away, more excited than scared at the once-in-a-lifetime opportunity. When it was time to get out, we got down on our hands and knees to crawl to safety until a fireman screamed, “GET DOWN!” and we realized we were going to have to army crawl the rest of the way to avoid smoke inhalation. I naively tried to keep shooting as I scooted to safety.  I was thrilled when my pictures made the front page that week.

After graduation, I got a full-time job at a small newspaper where I made up the entire staff. I did it all — wrote the articles, designed the pages and took all the photos. Each month I told people’s stories in words and pictures and I loved it.

At the same time, people around me started to notice my work and I became the go-to photographer for my friends and family: I shot weddings, band photos, pictures for Christmas cards and yearbook portraits for younger friends graduating from high school. I discovered a real passion for the way you can take control in portraiture through posing and lighting.

Several years, some photography classes, three cameras and a baby later, a stranger offered to pay me to take her pictures, and I was flattered enough to go for it. I have thrown myself into wedding and portrait photography ever since, and found myself inspired in new and exciting ways.

Just like writing articles, I have found that every click of my shutter is my way of freezing time and capturing a moment too important to be forgotten.

The journalist in me has found a new way of to tell a story — and I’d love to tell yours.